Taioba

Taioba
Scientific Name: Xanthosoma sagittifolium
Country of Origin: South America

Taioba is the leaf of tannia (Xanthosoma sagittifolium). This plant is originally from South America and is very similar in growth and appearance to taro (Colocasia esculenta) which is from Southeast Asia. The tubers of this tropical plant belong to the family Aracea. Both crops are grown for their root-like corms and cormels that are staples in most of the tropics and subtropics. They have many names, including malanga, yautia, ocumo criollo and cocoyam. With the colonization of the Americas after Columbus, Xanthosoma sagittifolium is now the largest producer. Taioba is not widely available in the US at the present time, but is grown in some home gardens.

Taioba is used as a leafy green similar to spinach. In fact, spinach is used as a substitute when taioba is not available. The leaves are usually cooked to eliminate calcium oxalate, an irritant. Taioba is popular in several states in Southeastern Brazil and it is unknown in other parts of the country.

Taioba

Taioba
Scientific Name: Xanthosoma sagittifolium
Country of Origin: South America

Taioba is the leaf of tannia (Xanthosoma sagittifolium). This plant is originally from South America and is very similar in growth and appearance to taro (Colocasia esculenta) which is from Southeast Asia. The tubers of this tropical plant belong to the family Aracea. Both crops are grown for their root-like corms and cormels that are staples in most of the tropics and subtropics. They have many names, including malanga, yautia, ocumo criollo and cocoyam. With the colonization of the Americas after Columbus, Xanthosoma sagittifolium is now the largest producer. Taioba is not widely available in the US at the present time, but is grown in some home gardens.

Taioba is used as a leafy green similar to spinach. In fact, spinach is used as a substitute when taioba is not available. The leaves are usually cooked to eliminate calcium oxalate, an irritant. Taioba is popular in several states in Southeastern Brazil and it is unknown in other parts of the country.

Taioba

Taioba
Scientific Name: Xanthosoma sagittifolium
Country of Origin: South America

Taioba is the leaf of tannia (Xanthosoma sagittifolium). This plant is originally from South America and is very similar in growth and appearance to taro (Colocasia esculenta) which is from Southeast Asia. The tubers of this tropical plant belong to the family Aracea. Both crops are grown for their root-like corms and cormels that are staples in most of the tropics and subtropics. They have many names, including malanga, yautia, ocumo criollo and cocoyam. With the colonization of the Americas after Columbus, Xanthosoma sagittifolium is now the largest producer. Taioba is not widely available in the US at the present time, but is grown in some home gardens.

Taioba is used as a leafy green similar to spinach. In fact, spinach is used as a substitute when taioba is not available. The leaves are usually cooked to eliminate calcium oxalate, an irritant. Taioba is popular in several states in Southeastern Brazil and it is unknown in other parts of the country.

Taioba

Taioba
Scientific Name: Xanthosoma sagittifolium
Country of Origin: South America

Taioba is the leaf of tannia (Xanthosoma sagittifolium). This plant is originally from South America and is very similar in growth and appearance to taro (Colocasia esculenta) which is from Southeast Asia. The tubers of this tropical plant belong to the family Aracea. Both crops are grown for their root-like corms and cormels that are staples in most of the tropics and subtropics. They have many names, including malanga, yautia, ocumo criollo and cocoyam. With the colonization of the Americas after Columbus, Xanthosoma sagittifolium is now the largest producer. Taioba is not widely available in the US at the present time, but is grown in some home gardens.

Taioba is used as a leafy green similar to spinach. In fact, spinach is used as a substitute when taioba is not available. The leaves are usually cooked to eliminate calcium oxalate, an irritant. Taioba is popular in several states in Southeastern Brazil and it is unknown in other parts of the country.

Cooking Terms

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